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Lubos Fiser - Complete Piano Sonatas

Fiser Complete Piano Sonatas now available in new Bärenreiter editions

 

Lubos Fiser

COMPLETE PIANO SONATAS
Editio Bärenreiter Praha completed the edition of all Fiser Piano Sonatas

Fiser’s eight piano sonatas have a special place in his œuvre. Fiser subsequently eliminated his second sonata (1956) from his compositional repertoire. From the third sonata onwards (1960), subtitled Fantasia, the composer wrote a two-movement composition, in which he continued to incorporate as his fundamental musical device the confrontation of sharp contrasts in tempo and mood. Beginning with his fourth sonata (1962–1964), Fišer created a single-movement work in an expressive, formally focused composition which betrays a progression towards greater compactness of musical shape in a concise yet effective musical testimony. The fifth sonata was written in 1974, the sixth sonata in 1978. The seventh sonata from 1985 was dedicated to František Maxián, the eighth sonata was written in 1995.

Complete Piano Sonatas by Lubos Fiser:

H 7911 | Sonata I     | 17.95 EUR  BUY
H 7957 | Sonata III   | 16.95 EUR  BUY
H 7988 | Sonata IV   | 15.95 EUR  BUY
H 7757 | Sonata V    | 15.95 EUR  BUY
H 7758 | Sonata VI "Fras" ("Čert") | 11.95 EURBUY
H 7766 | Sonata VII  | 15.95 EUR  BUY
H 7989 | Sonata VIII | 10.95 EUR  BUY

 

NEW PIANO SONATA NO. 1 was written in 1955. Fiser worked on it during his last year at the Prague Conservatoire under the supervision of Emil Hlobil. The piece is one of Fiser’s early works which still respect a traditional compositional approach. Unlike his major and late piano sonatas, this sonata has three movements, each representing the traditional Classical-Romantic form. The sonata was premiered by Fiser’s fellow-student and friend Antonín Jemelík in Theatre D34 on 30 January 1956.

The new setting for this piece is based on the single edition to date (SNKLHU, 1957); only with regard to a few inconsistencies in the score was it necessary to consult the composer’s manuscript (kept at the National Museum – Czech Museum of Music, acquisition number 297/2006).

H 7911, ISMN 979-2601-0445-7, EUR 17.95    BUY 

NEW PIANO SONATA NO. 3 was written in 1960 during the composer’s studies at HAMU (Music Faculty of the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague) under Emil Hlobil. The first half of the 1960s was the period during which Fiser’s musical language underwent fundamental change as he rapidly cultivated his own, distinctive style, established in Fifteen Prints after Dürer’s Apocalypse. This sonata thus also includes several essential traits which shift his compositional development further. The work has two movements, however, its internal structure abandons traditional form. The piece is divided into several short, mutually contrasting sections, whereby the distinctions between the adjacent parts are emphasised by the thematic and chordal treatment. These contrasts are also supported by the chosen dynamics, tempo and other expressional means. The harmony is largely based on traditional chords or their condensed form while, in certain passages, we will nevertheless come across semitone clusters or fourth chords. The melody is still chiefly diatonic; at times Fiser uses chromatic sequences. These new elements in Sonata No. 3 indicate an attempt to simplify his writing and ensure greatest transparency and impact. This endeavour became a basic characteristic of Fiser’s compositions from the mid-1960s onwards.

The sonata originally bore the postscript Fantasia, which was subsequently taken out by the composer. It was first performed by Ales Bílek in 1961. The new setting for this piece is based on the single edition to date (Panton, 1967); only with regard to a few inconsistencies in the score was it necessary to consult the composer’s manuscript (kept at the National Museum – Czech Museum of Music, acquisition number 297/2006).

H 7957, ISMN 979-2601-0446-4, EUR 16.95  BUY 

NEW PIANO SONATA NO. 4 from the years 1962–1964 is dedicated to the memory of Fiser’s friend, the pianist Antonín Jemelík, who died tragically. As a tribute to their friendship the composer incorporated into the introduction a quotation from their favourite work, Piano Sonata No. 10, Op. 70,by Alexander Scriabin. The tragedy of the death of the composer’s friend pervades the emotionally intense passage of unison octaves which follows the three-bar quotation. From a compositional point of view this work is a masterpiece of the mid-Sixties. Written as one movement, the piece is divided into numerous mutually contrasting segments which themselves are clearly grouped into two sections, exposition and development. The individual themes are introduced in the first section and thematically expanded in the second section. The motif treatment lies almost exclusively in the fragmenting or curtailing of the theme, or in the use of a combination of several themes, for the most part brief and eloquent. This compositional method, together with a clear-cut manner of execution, mainly semitonal melody and sharply contrastive dynamics, lends force and transparency to the piece. Piano Sonata No. 4 was completed in 1964 together with Symphonic Fresco, Concerto da camera for piano and orchestraand Fifteen Prints after Dürer’s Apocalypseand has earned its rightful place alongside them as masterpieces of Fiser’s œuvre.

The work was first performed by Pavel Stepán in Prague’s Rudolfinum in 1965. The new setting for this piece is based on the single edition to date (Panton, 1969); only with regard to a few inconsistencies in the score was it necessary to consult the composer’s manuscript (kept at the National Museum – Czech Museum of Music, acquisition number 297/2006).

H 7988, ISMN 979-2601-0447-1, EUR 15.95      BUY